The Bloomberg That Could Sink America

February 28, 2020, by Daniel Knopf, Assistant Opinion Editor. Leave a Comment

The yearlong debacle that is the Democratic primary nomination contest has begun to finally wind down in recent months, as the candidate field has been whittled down to a mere seven contenders. As politician after politician after spiritual guru realized that their candidacy was not viable, they withdrew from the field, allowing those who had […]

Sense and Political Sensibilities

February 28, 2020, by Tom Hanes, Staff Writer. 1 Comment

Across the 1990s, a long war was waged over whether or not university and high school English departments should continue to hold a specified canon of literature above the rest. Not only was the canon—which included the likes of Shelley, Blake, Johnson, Coleridge, Melville, Hawthorne, Shakespeare, Joyce, Faulkner, Nabakov, Pynchon,Tolstoy, Dante, Homer, Goethe, etc.—exclusively white, […]

Who Cares if You Listen: On Accessibility, Arts, and Language

February 28, 2020, by Trent Babington, Assistant Opinion Editor. 1 Comment

Once in a while, an article is published that is so deliciously elitist that to read it is like shooting up heroin. In this case, the article to which I am referring is “Who Cares if You Listen,” by Milton Babbitt:  “Granting to music the position accorded other arts and sciences promises the sole substantial […]

Bernie Has a Plan to Socialize Corporate Ownership and No One’s Talking About It

February 21, 2020, by Finn Collom, Contributing Writer. 7 Comments

Since October, Senator Bernie Sanders has had a plan to initiate a massive transfer of wealth into worker hands. Nestled in the policy weeds of the Bernie campaign website is a relatively tame-sounding section titled “Corporate Accountability and Democracy.” Here, the campaign states that under a Sanders presidency, the administration would push policy to establish […]

The Danger of Democratic Disdain

February 21, 2020, by Lucas White, Contributing Writer. 1 Comment

When the Senate voted on Wednesday, Feb. 5 to acquit President Trump on both articles of impeachment, a resigned sigh escaped the lips of the left. While Democrats in Congress and the Senate vehemently fought to prosecute Trump’s actions, the impeachment trial’s result was unsurprising, and the Senate voted along party lines. Following the vote, […]

Maybe We Should Interrogate Our Studio Art Department

February 21, 2020, by Jodie Kahan, Assistant Opinion Editor. 1 Comment

I have never taken a studio art class, but I do have a fascination with artists. This probably dates back to the pre-bat mitzvah Friday evenings I spent on the floor of my bedroom, reading Sylvia Plath, understanding little other than the myth that surrounded her tortured genius. Back when Tumblr was my primary aesthetic […]

Trump’s Misguided Efforts to Correct Real Architectural Elitism

February 14, 2020, by Tom Hanes, Staff Writer. Leave a Comment

A few days ago, the White House released documents pressing toward a new style guide for federal buildings. Officially, the executive order, “Make Federal Buildings Beautiful Again” is a strike for the neoclassical style: the august, severe, and elegantly monochrome stone facades of the U.S. Supreme Court house, the UVA Rotunda, and our own Russell House. […]

Bong Joon-ho at the Local Film Festival

February 14, 2020, by Tobias Wertime, Opinion Editor. Leave a Comment

Last Sunday, the South Korean film “Parasite” made history as the first foreign language film to take home the Academy Award for Best Picture. The underdog darling of this year’s awards season,“Parasite” won in the international film categories at the Golden Globes, the BAFTA awards, and even at the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast. The […]

New England Isn’t as Progressive as You Think

February 14, 2020, by Trent Babington, Assistant Opinion Editor. Leave a Comment

The confederate flag is generally not something you expect to see in New England. But I remember during my senior year of high school, at a small public school in rural Rhode Island, a band of ten or so students started pulling into the parking lot each morning with the stars and bars flying from […]

The Problem with Media Coverage of the 2020 Primaries

February 7, 2020, by Jack Leger, Foreign Correspondent. Leave a Comment

One of the most common refrains from Trump supporters during the 2016 campaign was the unfairness of the media, and while I understood the argument, my dislike for Trump’s style meant I paid little attention to how he was covered. However, the 2020 Democratic primary has exposed the many major flaws in the media coverage […]

« Older posts

Twitter